Leitz Wetzlar Colorplan-P 90/2.5 [V2]

Version 2 slide projector lens for original Leica Pradovit. Silver metal barrel, black plastic nose – known as ‘P1’. Made in Germany, branded Leitz. Later versions have markings on front, rather than side, of nose.

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Weight 132 g
Dimensions 90 mm
Focal Length (mm)

90

Max Aperture (f)

2.5

Min Aperture (f)

2.5

Aperture Type

Fixed

Elements

6 / 4

Sharp (Far)

71.5%

Rear Mount

42.5mm barrel

Front Thread

N/A

Flange-Focal Distance (mm)

39

Extension (mm)

19

Production

1967-1977

Serial Numbers

N/A

Bokeh Character

Mild swirl. Very mild bubble. Attractive.

Stars

0

Reviews

  1. 16:9

    Reviewed as a projector lens, Chasseur d’Images magazine awarded V1 and V2 Leitz/Leica Colorplans 5/5 for image quality. This later six-element [V2] is often said to be an upgrade over the five-element [V1]. As taking lenses, both are well known and relative bargains if you can live with the fixed f2.8 aperture.
    The [V2] is actually less sharp in Zone 1 than the older lens, but clearly improves on it in Zone 3. Its bokeh is also slightly smoother: with much less cat-eye deformation in Zones 2/3, and less of a ‘smeared’ quality. In fact, time and again, this lens was considered to generate the creamiest and most attractive bokeh of all the fast 90mm lenses: free of soap bubbles and often surprisingly painterly and well blended. The coatings are better, too – but of course, when using a lens like this, flare is a given (and not always unwelcome) part of the package.
    Don’t expect particularly impressive sharpness – especially away from its Zone 1 sweet spot, this version of the Colorplan resolves poorly even compared to the Rollei/Schneider and Agfa/Braun versions and so doesn’t rise above a Bronze rating, even though it outresolves the original Colorplan slightly centre frame at all distances. For a projector lens, chromatic aberrations are well controlled, too: this isn’t a perfectly corrected lens, but it’s not bad.
    Overall, the Colorplan deserves its reputation: for many it’s the first PJ lens to try. Fitted to the Leica’s Pradovit series it’s common enough, and at present prices, it’s almost inconsequential that it carries a small premium over lesser known but equally good alternatives. It therefore remains a top recommendation.

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